Gunns Travels Update & Current Plans

Gunns Travels Update & Current Plans

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Hello!

It has been a little while since I last gave any kind of update on my current situation in regards to travel; and so I thought that, before I carried on I would give anyone who has followed up to this point an update.

If you haven’t followed up to this point, then I’ll give you a brief catch up: On this site I tell the stories of my travels and give an honest account of the things I have experienced. I have volunteered in Nepal, travelled Australia and talked in depth about my experience as a Team Leader in Ghana with VSO – all of this and more you can find on my blog. Most recently I used my TEFL qualification to go and teach English in Shanghai, China. Now we are all up to date, let me tell you how after all that, I ended up back in the UK taking a different path to what I had intended on doing for the next year…

So, I am back in the UK and although I’m not happy about the sudden drop in temperature change, I am happy to be back; but not for the reasons you’d expect.

Coming home is obviously full of nice comforts: foods, family, understanding shop assistants, not getting hit by cars crossing the road…but I am more happy to be back, so I can focus on things that I have more passion for. Don’t get me wrong, teaching English in Shanghai was a fantastic opportunity and I certainly learnt a lot from it. I got to experience daily life in China and be immersed in a culture that I had been long fascinated by – as well as getting to fit as many freshly steamed dumplings into my time as possible! But for me it was never about pursuing a career in teaching, which I came to find was a pretty common thing amongst foreign teachers doing the same.

Let me say first up that living in a different country is hard. I am no stranger to being away from home but this time it was different. I think in the end for me, it was that I had put myself into an environment that I just wouldn’t enjoy living in. It came as no surprise to me that the neon, grey bricked and sky scraping surroundings were going to be something that just didn’t interest me.

The novelty soon wore off for me; I enjoyed seeing it all for the first few weeks and then weeks turned into months and I found that the surroundings were having a direct effect on me. I’m more of a green open space kind of guy. I enjoyed aspects of the job and I loved living the Chinese culture – I was even taking Chinese lessons! The only thing was I knew I didn’t want to pursue teaching as a career and knew there were other passions I had put on hold because I had wanted to see how this experience went. It wasn’t working. I weighed it up and decided that the best thing for me was to head home and ‘re-group’.

Fast forward to now and as I sip my boiling hot coffee trying to ward off the chill of a Friday morning. I feel so much happier knowing that, although I have yet again decided to steer off into a different direction. I am only heading to something more fulfilling – at least that’s my hope.

Right, all sounds great but what’s the actual update? Ok, ok – sometimes I gotta find a creative outlet for writing ya know?

THE PLAN (along with some amendments and minor changes to ‘the plan version 26 original draft’)

My passions have always been surrounded by travel: most notably my volunteering experiences. They have been what have defined me and my goals from the start of this travelling bug or full fledged personality trait as it now has manifested into.

What I have realised is that it is not necessarily ‘travelling‘ that is what I need to feel ‘happy’. It is the sense of personal freedom that comes with something like travelling. I guess it’s more the sense of being able to move around anywhere, anytime without being tied to anything. Which is a pretty common desire for so many people that are pursuing the ‘laptop lifestyle‘ the ‘digital nomads‘ and ‘dreamers‘. This is what I want to create for myself and this blog.

My first point of action is to focus more time on the things that fuel my creativity. I want to dedicate more time to design, drawing and creative outlets. I have begun to try and create habits that help me sustain my ‘creative bank account‘ but as much as I wish it did, currently this doesn’t sustain my ‘financial bank account‘.

I’ve set up my store which sells a variety of unique hand drawn products inspired by my travels that I hope to grow and add to in the next few months!

Gunns Designs Shop More Products

My second motivation is to put more time into my other passion: volunteering. I will be working for Latitude Global Volunteering in their digital marketing & design department for the next 3 months! They are a global player in the volunteering sector and here is a little snippet of what they believe in:


Lattitude-Global-Volunteering-jpg-1

“Lattitude Global Volunteering is an international youth development charity.  Our mission is to educate and develop young people worldwide by providing opportunities to volunteer abroad and to make a positive difference to the lives of others through a distinctive, challenging, structured and supported overseas volunteering experience in a culture and community different from their own.

Through volunteering abroad, we give young people the opportunity to experience the world beyond their community and to truly engage with it.  We help to develop young people’s awareness and responsibilities towards themselves and others, and equip them with employability and life skills.”


They’re pretty awesome and I’m proud to be working somewhere that I can truly be passionate about!

I’ll also be taking on multiple part time ‘side projects‘ (a fancy way of saying I’ll be taking on retail work *again*, client work and any commissions I can get!) to supplement the time I’m investing into these passions. I say ‘investing‘ because hopefully I’ll see a return on it early next year but if nothing else, I would have focused towards the ‘lifestyle‘ I am striving for.

Lastly, I want to say a big THANK YOU to everyone who has read, supported, bought art, encouraged or endured my constant ‘change of plans’ in the last few years of writing about my travels & creating artwork. I always appreciate every opportunity I have had and I hope to continue to inspire more adventures, creativity and to follow your passion persistently until you create your own reality.

Peace & Love

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China Instagram Highlights

China Instagram Highlights

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As with all my trips I captured a lot of the people, places and moments whilst working in China. There’s nothing I enjoy more than giving others a glimpse into daily life whilst I travel. My chosen platform is always Instagram and with this post I thought I’d round up my favourite posts from my time in China. It was hard to choose a few for this post, so if you want to see more remember to check my Instagram for more! If you’d like to read more about my time in China then read this post on Shanghai and here for Beijing.

The neon lights in East Nanjing make walking around a sightseeing adventure of their own 👌🏻#streetart

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Amazing views seen from The Bund at night. Need to find somewhere high up for the next shot #shanghaicity

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Orderly chaos in the backstreets of the city #exploreshanghai #chinagram

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Sitting, waiting and thinking #peopleofshanghai

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#templeart #goldenbuddha

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‘Three’s a crowd’ #shanghai #peopleofshanghai

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#peopleofbeijing #beijing 🇨🇳

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Hidden places walking through the famous hutongs of the capital 🇨🇳 #streetshots #chinatravel

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#streettour #peopleofbeijing 🇨🇳

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New post on #Beijing is up on the blog *link in bio* #chinatravel

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Last full week in #Shanghai and I’m making sure I explore as much as possible #cityviews

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🗺👌🏻#landscapehunter #viewsfordays

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你好 Nǐ hǎo China | Observations, Culture and Reflections

你好 Nǐ hǎo China | Observations, Culture and Reflections

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I have now been in China for almost half a year, which is crazy to think how fast the time has gone. It has been both a fascinating discovery and one of my hardest experiences yet. It’s been up and down throughout my short time here. Things are also about to change again for me. I’ve written down a few of my observations from my daily life living in China and what I have experienced whilst working in the pearl of the orient, Shanghai.

Language

Chinese lessons

Since arriving in China one of the first things that hit me was the obvious language difference. Listening to sounds I’d never heard before. People communicating and not being able to read anything was a new feeling. I’d experienced a different language before sure, but at least it was the same alphabet! This immersion in a new and unfamiliar surrounding meant I had to learn fast. Within a couple of weeks of arriving i’d picked up a few of the basics – if I was pronouncing them correctly is a different thing altogether. I knew I had to be serious about it or not all. Luckily Shanghai is such an international city that there are English translations for most things here and people get by living here for years without having to speak any Chinese. They also have a ‘pinyin’ version of the Chinese characters, which is great! But what’s the point of going to a different country and not giving it a go! I found a Chinese tutor to go alongside my own self teaching schedule and a few months later I feel a little more confident with the basics. I can read some characters which is pretty cool and I’m enjoying getting to grips with it as time goes on.

Tones

If you’ve learnt or are learning Mandarin Chinese, then you’ll know straight away that there are different tones when you speak. It’s like you’re singing and unfortunately for me, I pretty much have one tone when I talk. So, learning the 4 basic tones was difficult. I could be saying the same thing over and over but because I haven’t gone slightly high in my tone or high then low, the word can be misheard or not received at all.

Characters

Learning some of the ancient Chinese characters was always a dream of mine and I can say now I know at least 10 different characters and how to write them. Only another 3000+ to go, small steps! It’s fascinating to see them everywhere and I feel like the smartest person ever when I can identify some of the characters while I’m waiting for the metro! I still have yet to take a calligraphy class to learn the traditional way of painting these characters but I can’t wait to try it out.

Language barriers and understandings

As I’ve experienced before a different language comes with different understandings of words and meanings. I have miscommunications about really small simple things on a daily basis here. Sometimes it’s as simple as ‘how are you?’….which sometimes gets a blank stare but on the whole it’s usually resolved by laughing it off and a smile! If you travel anywhere you’ve always got to be prepared for some sort of language barrier, that’s why I always try to learn the basics. If you make the effort, It shows you care about their culture and language too.

Kids in class teach me

One of the best things about teaching is learning stuff from the kids! Every time we break halfway through class they find it hilarious to teach me some Chinese. They’ll often scribble out a character on the board and I have to remind them that I need to learn baby Chinese first, which they find hilarious and jot down the pinyin version for me. Keep laughing kids, I’m still getting a free Chinese lesson!

Culture

It goes without saying that Chinese culture is both ancient and unique. There really is nothing like it and getting to live and breathe it first hand is a truly an incredible experience. I have always dreamt of seeing the diverse traditions, details and customs that this country holds. I have not been disappointed when it comes to grandure, tastes and festivals. Shanghai is a modern metropolis sandwich with parts of old tradition. I’m looking forward to exploring more of this enormous country!

Late night #streetfood is where it’s at 👌🏻#foodography

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Roads

All I will say is that if you have been to Asia in general you’ll understand why the ‘road system’ (if there is one) is so different to that in the west. Red and green lights have a whole new meaning here. Just get across alive.

Phones

Everyone here is glued to their phone. There is no age limit to it either. You’ll often find the young and elderly both playing their favorite crush games or scrolling through wechat moments in the metro and around the city. In fact, if you just take a trip on the metro and look up around you, you’ll notice everyone will be looking down into their rectangular shaped abyss’ for the entire journey. They’ll still be looking at it as they bump their way out into the doors and up the escalators too.

‘Three’s a crowd’ #shanghai #peopleofshanghai

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Family unit

Having a family is the pinnical of most Chinese peoples goals. They give everything to their children and from what I saw, sometimes over do it! But the intentions are good. It is also normal to send a quarter (sometimes more) of your wages to your parents every month when they are older to care for them. Incorporating the elderly into family life and society is so apparent in China. Something western society could learn so much from. However, there’s always a flip side, this integration into the family unit is usually because the parents are too busy and overworked to care/give attention for their children. I was able to witness that every day when it was the grandparents who dropped off and picked up the students from school.

I have learnt a lot about the country, culture and people in my 6 months I’m China. It’s incredibly different to anything I’ve experienced and if I’m honest I don’t think I was expecting it to be so hard. Who knows how long I’ll be here for and if things will get easier with my lessons and adjustment. All I know is that I am grateful I have had the chance to see parts of China that I had always dreamed of seeing. If you’re interested in heading to Beijing, check out my post here!

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Green Spaces | Shanghai

Green Spaces | Shanghai

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This is a post about the ‘green spaces’ in Shanghai. As someone who is usually surrounded by nature when I travel, living and working in a city is something new to me; so of course I had to search out the little pockets in the city. There are some stunning places to visit and I will continue to update this post with new places I visit in the coming weeks. But I wanted to start with a few spots I have found so far…

Yu Yuan Garden

In the first few weeks of arriving in Shanghai I had to be a full on tourist, so hit all the hot spots in Shanghai! Yu Yuan Garden was one of the first things I visited and I was relieved to find a peaceful spot in amongst the beautiful chaos of the bustling city surroundings.

/ Yu / in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying

“Yu Yuan Garden is a famous classical garden located in Anren Jie, Shanghai. It was finished in 1577 by a government officer of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) named Pan Yunduan. Yu in Chinese means pleasing and satisfying, and this garden was specially built for Pan’s parents as a place for them to enjoy a tranquil and happy time in their old age.”

Entry cost is 30RMB so about £3! Super cheap for a great morning or afternoon visit and worthwhile trip.

I thought the gardens were fascinating to walk around and admire the old Chinese architecture. A bit surreal when you look up and notice skyscrapers towering around this tranquil ancient garden. The pond in the centre is filled with golden fish and terrapins for you to relax with. A nice chance to have a little space from the cramped city outside – as long as it is not too busy with tourists or locals! Plan an early visit to get the chance for a little more tranquility.

I’ve always thought Chinese #dragons were pretty awesome 🐉🇨🇳

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Finding the little peaceful spots 🙏 #positivevibes

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I’d definitely recommend a visit to this beautiful garden situated in the city. Once you’re done with the garden there are hundreds of shops, old Chinese style buildings and food stalls for you to grab some delicious Chinese cuisine and souvenirs.

Century Park

Along Line 2 on the Shanghai Metro is the stop for Century Park, a huge green space that has been designated for forest areas and a big lake with a backdrop of the skyscrapers surrounding the park. It costs 10RMB to get into the park for the day. You can grab food at some of the restaurants and cafes found scattered around the park, go on a small boat around the lake, listen to music at an open amphitheater, visit the small amusement park for kids or a spot of fishing.

Make sure you stay up to date by following my social channels – I upload regularly to Instagram and right now there are some pretty cool shots from my Shanghai so far. Check them out and connect!

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How To Teach Abroad In China | Step-By-Step Guide TEFL English

How To Teach Abroad In China | Step-By-Step Guide TEFL English

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The complete process of thinking, applying & securing a job in China teaching English – from what you should consider to obtaining your permit & work visa!

I have taken the steps to teach English abroad in China for 1 year (maybe more!). For the last few months I have been applying, interviewing and getting everything ready for my trip abroad to teach. There has been a lot involved and I wanted to create this guide to help anyone thinking of doing the same thing; or someone who is looking to travel abroad but needs an idea of how to go about doing it.

Taking the time to read through this guide should give you an idea on what to expect, whether it is something you are interested in and the steps you need to take to get that job in China!

Why Teach abroad?

why should you teach abroad?

So a good place to start is establish why you should teach abroad? It is definitely something that took a lot of thinking about for me. It’s not something I wanted to rush into and you should take the time to do as much research as you can, so you can weigh up whether this is something that is a realistic commitment you can make and would like to do.

For a start, it is a great way to earn some money! Unless you are able to live off ‘the zest of life‘ and have no financial commitments you’ll be needing money of some sort to fund whatever it is you want to do. For me I needed to fund travelling and mostly plane tickets!

So I researched lots of ways to make money and then I came across the idea of teaching English abroad. I fitted the necessary requirements to be able to teach as I had also just completed my degree and was fluent in English; however I wanted to strengthen this and enrolled in an online TEFL course to help my application as well.

It is also a great way to combine travelling with working – a very popular choice amongst people wanting to sustain both lifestyles. You get to work in a brand new place, experience a new culture, travel in your free time and have an amazing experience working in a different place. Pretty great and exactly the kind of thing I wanted to do!


Requirements to English Teach Abroad:
  • Be 18 years old or over
  • Have a degree or qualification in teaching in English (TEFL, TESOL, EFL) – minimum of 120 hours completed
  • Native speaker of English or fluent
  • Have all the necessary requirements to be able to leave your country to work and the time to work abroad for up to 1 year

Tick all of those? Great! Next up is securing that 120 hours of TEFL/TESOL/EFL teaching. In my case…

How I got My TEFL?

Again I did a lot of research into the best courses, read blog posts and reviews to get a feeling of where to go and what was the best. Much of the courses are similar and all aim to equip you with the minimum 120 hour online certificate that you need to apply for teaching jobs abroad.

The course I did, broke teaching down into sub topics like: lesson planning, psychology and classroom techniques. It also offered mini quizzes in between each section as well as videos to demonstrate the things they were teaching. I really enjoyed the variety of resources used to teach it as it is a lot to digest in one chunk. I completed end of course essays and created my own lesson plans which were marked and given back to me by an examiner with teaching experience.

It took me about 3 months to complete the 120 hours, as I made sure I did a few hours everyday.

I won’t go into too much detail because I have written up my review of i-i LoveTEFL over on my previous blog post here, which you can read to find out if it is something you would like to do as well. But research, research, research! There’s always deals and new courses being released so scout for the best!

teach abroad in china - how to guide

Applying for Your Dream Job to Teach Abroad!

If you have got to this point you must have ticked all the requirement boxes and have your new teaching certificate (TEFL, TESOL, EFL) firmly in hand! Great, now it is time to start applying for teaching opportunities abroad! First decide where you’d like to teach, there are so many places that you can now with your certificate. Popular choices are Korea, Japan and China but you can also go teach in South America and many European countries.

I chose China because it was amongst the top wage earners for teaching English and it is also somewhere I have always wanted to explore and experience.

For applications it’s good to make sure you have these documents ready and scanned in:

  • Passport
  • TEFL or equivalent certificate
  • Degree (if applicable)
  • Resume or CV in word format

I started by checking various job boards for job postings in any area of China but I had in mind 3 or 4 places I wanted to go. These were Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu or Huangzuo because I had already researched a lot about these places and they kept coming up in TEFL reviews online – so I figured that these were popular choices to teach abroad.

I used these job boards:

Teach Away

Teach-English-In-China

English First

Gold Star Recruitment

Disney English

I found that these job boards provided the best results in my case. I received instant feedback from all the job opportunities I applied for and the recruitment people I dealt with were all very helpful and communicated the jobs well. However I found that Gold Star stood out for me in terms of there customer service. It was clear and transparent from day 1 and I received my job posting through them. I was linked to Kid Castle Language School for a job they had teaching English in Shanghai.

Interviewing hints and tips to make sure you get a great job to teach abroad!

teach abroad Interview Hints & Tips

I had a few interviews with different recruiters and companies via phone call or Skype.

The interviews are fairly brief ranging from about 20-30 minutes. Most of them ask similar things and the recruiters are mainly just making sure you tick the boxes and are aware of the effects of moving abroad. Once you get through to companies and schools they obviously spend a bit more time having a conversation with you to make sure you suit the role and answer any questions you have left.

There are lots of reviews on the net for you to access about people’s experience with specific recruiters or schools. In my experience I had fairly positive feedback however there was one that I passed on fairly quickly. The recruiter didn’t seem to care about me as a person and just seemed to want to get me out there asap to fill in a number for them. You have to make sure the school is a good fit for you and that you’re not just being fast tracked to make the recruiters numbers look good.


What questions should you be asking?

Here are a few questions to note when going through the interview process – I’d ask as soon as you can, don’t wait to get all the way to the end before you start finding some of these answers out!

  • What is the salary?
  • What are the hours?
  • What age range would I be teaching?
  • Do you have a curriculum?
  • Is there freedom with the curriculum?
  • What office hours are there? What are the classroom hours?
  • Am I entitled to holidays?
  • Do I get sick pay?
  • What accommodation do you provide? if any? (Some schools will provide somewhere for you to stay for the first month while you find somewhere to live)
  • Do you pick-up from the airport?
  • Do you provide training?
  • Do you cover medical, visa and flight costs? (Most places will re-imburse you these expense but make sure you double check! if they don’t find somewhere else as they are probably not a great place to work for!) (Also most schools offer a completion bonus on completing your 1 year contract!)
  • Do you have an employee handbook copy you can send me or email over?
  • Is there any progression in the role? (If you’re wanting to stay for more than a year it is worth considering)
  • Do you offer health insurance through the company?
  • How long is the probationary period for the job?

What to look out for in contracts:

Like any other job role you want to be looking out for the usual requirements you’d expect to see in the contract, these include:

  • Salary details
  • Probationary period
  • Sick pay
  • Holiday entitlement/pay
  • Hours
  • Bonuses (Completion)
  • Health insurance
  • Dismissal details
  • Start/end dates

You Will Need:

  • Passport photos – I’d recommend getting a bunch of these done, I always have loads spare. You’ll need them for your contract, application forms, medical and visa so stock up!
  • Passport copies
  • TEFL Certificate copies
Passing A Medical Exam for Your Permit & Visa:

teach abroad Interview Hints & Tips-2

Once you have been offered a job you will need to begin the process of applying for permits and your working visa. It’s a little bit of a long process so make sure you factor in the time if your waiting to start the job or finishing one job to go to this one.

I’d say from the point of getting the job it took about 6 months for me to receive paperwork, fill in paperwork, go for medicals, wait for permits and secure visas! Having said that my experience is a little different because I was doing this whilst in Ghana volunteering! So I’d say allow more like 3 months to have everything completed and ready to go comfortably.

For my medical I had a little bit of a nightmare! It was a lot of frustration and trial and error, so having experienced getting one done, I can now save that hassle for you!


Chinese Visa Medical Exam Requirements:

• General medical examination
• Chest x-ray
• Resting ECG (electrocardiogram)
• Blood group test
• HIV test
• Syphilis test

The main thing you want on the form is ‘Fit for work’ + Official stamp + Original test results + a signature from the doctor

You’ll need to go private. It will be way quicker, convenient and guaranteed to pass over in China if you do. They are very strict about their applications, so it’s best to be on the safe side to save yourself time! I tried to go through my GP but 1. The Chinese symbols on the form make GP’s not want to sign their name against it because of being hesitant about the true translation. 2. It would also mean you would be required to have various tests in different clinics and have waiting times for each one. In all, this would be a long drawn out process if you did get a willing GP to do it – however if you had the time I guess you could…

BUT private medical is really the easiest way – expensive but if your company is re-imbursing you anyway then it is worth while doing it. I got my medical done through Harley Health Centre which cost me £375 (plus £10 for them to post the documents recorded to me the next day) which is about the average price for a China Visa Medical. They already had a China Visa medical form printed and the doctor filled all the sections required; they had completed visa medical forms previously.

“I found the service quick, clear and efficient. I booked for the next day, made my way up to London and was seen/done within about 1 hour 30 minutes in total. I spent 30 minutes having a full medical examination with a doctor who was friendly and quick. I had my vitals checked, blood test, blood pressure, basic eye test and ECG. I was sent 5 minutes down the road to have my Chest X-ray straight after. The whole process was easy and very fast which is what I was looking for. After 1 day the doctor phoned me with the results to explain everything and then sent the documents in the post to me. I received them the following day which was great! I’d highly recommend using them for your China visa medical exam.” – Jack Gunns (Gunns Travels)

Foreign Expert Work Permit – What? Why? How?

teach abroad foreign expert work permit and z-visa

“The Work Permit is a legal document from the foreign expert supervision department of the employer. This document means the holder has the legal right to work in China as a foreign expert.”


Your employer should be the one to apply for this for you. It takes them a few weeks to do this, and there is no formal tracking for the due-date.  However, based off of average processing times + holidays according to my employer having experience with this, they expect to have your Foreign Expert Work Permit within about 20-30 days.

Once they obtain the permit, it will be another 3-5 days to obtain the Invitation Letter (required for the Z Visa).  Then they can mail over these 2 documents, and you will bring them to the Chinese Embassy/Consulate to obtain a Z Visa (2-5 business days).

 

*As of April 2017 you now also need to get your degree legalised, certified and notarised for your application for working permit in China.*


Invitation Letter

Along with your Foreign Expert Work Permit you’ll need to secure an invitation letter from China as well. The teaching company you apply with should get both the permit and the letter for you; before sending them to the UK so you can obtain your Z-Visa.

An Invitation Letter issued by companies, corporations, institutions or individuals in China. If the invitation letter is issued by an individual in China, the photocopy of the ID of the individual is required.


Securing Your Z-Visa:

Take a breath, you’re almost there!

Obtaining the second part to the visa is going to the Chinese Embassy nearest to you (London Chinese Embassy or The Consulate in Manchester.) For me I went to the Chinese Embassy in London (Central Line to Bank and 5 mins walk to centre)

You Will Need:

  • Passport
  • Visa Application Form
  • Passport Photo
  • Invitation Letter
  • Foreign Expert Work Permit

As well as all of these documents make sure you photocopy all of them once or twice, just to be sure. They will want copies of them for the application and will give the originals back to you. If you are unable to get copies before you go, don’t worry as they have photocopiers at the centre you can use (50p per sheet).


*Here is a link to the Visa Application Form of the People’s Republic of China(Form V. 2013) – that you can download and fill out.*


They also say:

“One of the following documents for those who shall stay for more than 90 days after entry:

(1) Foreigners Employment Permit of the People’s Republic of China issued by Chinese government authorities for Human Resources and Social Security, as well as Invitation Letter of Duly Authorized Entity or Confirmation Letter of Invitation issued by relevant Chinese entities.

(2) Permit for Foreign Experts Working in China issued by the State Bureau of Foreign Experts as well as Invitation Letter of Duly Authorized Entity or Confirmation Letter of Invitation issued by relevant Chinese entities.

(3) Registration Certificate of Resident Representative Offices of enterprises of foreign countries(regions) issued by Chinese authorities of industrial and commercial administration, as well as Invitation Letter of Duly Authorized Entity or Confirmation Letter of Invitation issued by relevant Chinese entities as well as Invitation Letter of Duly Authorized Entity or Confirmation Letter of Invitation issued by relevant Chinese entities.

(4) An approval document for commercial performances issued by the Chinese government authorities for cultural affairs or Invitation Letter of Duly Authorized Entity or Confirmation Letter of Invitation issued by relevant Foreign Affairs Office of provincial governments of China.

(5)Letter of Invitation to Foreigners for Offshore Petroleum Operations in Chinaissued by China National Offshore Oil Corporation.”

This means your (1) foreign expert work permit!

How To Teach Abroad In China - Visa Fees
Chinese Embassy in London prices correct as of 14/02/2017

 

Service fees of Chinese Visa Application Service Centre:

Standard service: £66 (including VAT) – the visa will be ready for collection on the fourth working day;

Express service: £78 (including VAT) – Express service: the visa will be ready for collection on the third working day (subject to approval);

Postal service: £90 (including VAT) – Group visa applications require five working days to process. There are no express services for group applications. An additional visa fee of £15 per visa will be charged. (Please note not all nationalities are eligible for express service.)

Total visa charge = (visa fees +service fee) * number of persons in the group | (In my case it’s £85 + £66 = £151 as I required standard service)

Make sure you book an appointment in advance as you’ll need to secure a booking slot to go and apply for your Z-Visa. They say apply for the visa at least 1 month in advance but do it as soon as you can, I actually booked mine 2 weeks before and will get my visa back a few days before I am due to fly. But to be on the safe side, give yourself enough time – especially if using the postal service as this could take a few days to get back to you.

If you are collecting the visa from the centre, they will give you a receipt to come back with 3-4 working days after; you will not have to pay until you collect for this option.


When you go to your visa appointment you should have with you:

  • Visa application form (filled out)
  • Valid Passport
  • Invitation Letter
  • Foreign Expert Work Permit
  • Passport Photos
  • + Extra copies of all these documents
  • Method of payment i.e. Debit card or cash (If applying by post, they ONLY accept debit card payment)

Once you have your Z-Visa you are now ready to go and start your new job!

IMPORTANT: Remember to apply for an extension visa when you actually get to China and register at your nearest police station, as the Z Visa is valid for 3 months only! 

Booking Flights To Your New Job!

teach abroad and book flights to your new job!

There are so many sites you can use to book flights but some brief travel hack flight searching techniques are:

  • Make your browser private or go ‘incognito‘ this makes sure the sights don’t use cookies to track your searches and movements, resulting in inflated prices because they know what you’re looking for 😉
  • Browse a few different sites to get the best deal

I use a mixture of Skyscanner (they let you search ‘whole month’ to find the cheapest day to fly and Kayak which is another great search comparison to find the best money for your budget!

How to teach english abroad in china - sky scanner
How to teach english abroad in china - kayak


Going To Teach!

We made it!

Finally after securing all of that we are now heading to China to teach English. From this point I have no idea what to expect, but from the research I’ve done and things I have read, I can certainly say I’m excited to work, live and learn in a completely new exciting place! I’ll continue to help & blog about my time in China to help anyone thinking of doing the same!

My aim is to help anyone considering this massive life decision. It really is something to sit and think about, you can see from reading to this point that there is a lot to consider and do. Really weigh up wether it is something you want to do and then get planning with this (I hope) helpful guide!

Remember to read up on learning some mandarin, brush up on ancient Chinese civilization/history, and/or become knowledgeable about China’s current political affairs. These can all help broaden your understanding of the culture you will soon be immersed in, and allow you to get more out of your time there!

Good Luck with your next steps and whatever you decide to do!

Follow along my journey and get some inspiration from my social channels below 😀

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Travel. Create, Be Nice!

If you think this was helpful, please pin the image below and help someone else out who might be considering a move to China!

Teach Abroad How To Guide - Pinterest image

My Most Used Travel Gear Essentials

My Most Used Travel Gear Essentials

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We all have those go to essentials when we travel right? In this post I’ll list everything that I must have in my backpack when I travel. We live in a digital age so most of it comprises of electronics and digital enhancing travel goodies.

Most used travel gear essentials:

My Most Used Travel Gear Essentials

Anker Power Bank (1)

One of my most used travel essentials is definitely my ‘Anker Power Bank‘ It has saved me on so many occasions where I have had no access to power or have been in places that suffer from frequent power outages. It is robust, durable and can charge up to 3 devices at the same time via 3 USB slots. It charges my phone (iPhone 4S) up to 6 full charges and a full laptop (HP Notebook) charge. It has a torch function on the side as an added extra.

Cons – Slightly heavier than some of the others on the market. However it has never affected the portability in my case.

DSLR Camera (For photographers) (2)

These days with phone cameras and small portable cameras like Gopro’s, carrying a DSLR isn’t necessary; however I have always loved to use a DSLR when taking photos. There is still a higher quality you get when taking photos with a DSLR and as an amateur photographer this is something important to me.

I have been using Nikon products for about 10 years now and I can say that they always deliver on quality whilst providing you with options to take control of every aspect of the photos outcome. I have been using my ‘Nikon D7000 Digital SLR Camera with 18-105mm VR Lens Kit (16.2MP) 3 inch LCD‘ for about 5 years now and the quality is outstanding; with a 32-point auto focusing ring & high ISO (100-3200/H1&H2) performance in low light makes it a very versatile and effective camera.

Before the D7000, I was using a ‘Nikon D40 & 60‘ both great cameras for first time DLSR users – very good quality and easy to use controls.

I usually use a f1.8 50mm lens too, which captures most shots from portraits to landscapes. However I also switch between a f4.5 55-200mm and my go to kit lens f3.5 18-55mm.

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR f/1.8G Lens – 50 mm

Nikon 20050 AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200 mm VR II Lens for Camera

Nikon 18 – 55 mm f/3.5 – 5.6G VR AF-P DX Nikkor Lens for Camera

Here are a few examples of shots I have taken with each:

GoPro Hero 3 + (3)

A popular choice for most travellers and I am no different, my ‘GoPro Hero 3+‘ is great for being portable and resilient when I’m capturing moments on my travels. The housing that comes with it means I don’t have to worry about it being broken or getting knocked in action. It can shoot in 1080p and is easy to use via a 1 click button on the top and front of the camera. The housing means that the camera is waterproof so can also be used in water and allows you to capture great underwater photos/footage as well.

GoPro HERO3+ Silver Edition Camera/Camcorder

Cons – The red light on the front when recording flashes which can be distracting when trying to be discreet in public places – I get around this by putting some black tape over it which usually does the job. The sound quality is affected by the housing around the camera, so if you’re looking to capture sound I’d look into microphones or separate sound recorders to use with it.

Disposable Camera (4)

I love using disposables when travelling. They are lightweight, durable and take retro snaps for your travel journal – also very cheap and affordable! A great back up to carry with you if you can’t use your camera or phone!

Kodak Fun Flash Disposable Camera – 39 Exposures Pack of 2

Travel Journal/Notebook (5)

It may sound simple but having a journal or notebook is a great item to take with you if you’re a travel blogger or traveller in general. I’m aways getting ideas when I’m out and love to collect important information like times, dates, prices and receipts. It’s also a great idea to write up about your travels as you go because you meet so many interesting people along the way and go through a lot of different emotions that you’ll want to look back on in the future.
Travel Notebook: Gifts / Gift / Presents ( Ruled Traveler’s Notebook with Antique Map Cover ) (Travel & World Cultures)

Swiss Army Knife or Multitool (6)

A great item to carry with you! Always very handy and I nearly always use this when I am travelling – even if the ‘spork’ function is my most used!

Victorinox Huntsman Pocket Knife – Red

Mini Wireless Speakers (7)

A good item to carry with you if you’re volunteering or travelling with people is a ‘mini speaker’. It’s great to be social with and creates a fun atmosphere instantly. Try this ‘Speaker’ on the road – it’s served me well the times I have had to use one.

Portable Speakers, ZENBRE M4 Wireless Bluetooth Speakers with Enhanced Bass Resonator, Mini Speaker for iPhone, iPod, Computer, Laptop, Tablet (Black)

Sleeping Bag (8)

I always carry a sleeping with me – usually my lightweight ‘sleeping bag’ which covers me for most cases. If you’re going more extreme I’d advise getting a thicker tog as this is only a 2 season bag.

Lixada Envelope Outdoor Sleeping Bag Camping Travel Hiking Multifuntion Ultra-light

Travel Towel (9)

I use a ‘trespass’ mini travel towel which always comes in pretty handy!

Trespass UUACMIE30019_BBTEACH Wringin Microfibre Towel – Blue, 70 X 135 cm

First Aid Kit (10)

Of course you should never travel anywhere without one of these! I have never had to use mine for me ‘touch wood’ but it always seems to come into use for others when I’m travelling (especially plasters/bandaids when I’ve been volunteering with kids – plasters/bandaids are like gold dust once the kids find them!)

90 Piece Premium First Aid Kit Bag – Includes Eyewash, 2 x Cold (Ice) Packs and Emergency Blanket for Home, Office, Car, Caravan, Workplace, Travel

Universal Travel Plug (11)

Without a doubt, if you have all this fancy technology and gizmos when you travel you’ll need a universal adapter plug so you’re prepared for any country you visit. So much easier than carrying different plug adapters for different countries.

Travel Adaptor -Tevina Travel Charger Two USB Ports Universal World Wide All-in-one Wall Charger Adapter Plug Built-in 3.2 A For Home (Black)

 

My Most Used Travel Apps (12)

Dualingo – “Learn Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Irish, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, and English. Totally fun. Totally free.”

Currency Converter – “Convert every world currency with the XE Currency App – Free Edition. It offers live proprietary currency rates, charts, and even stores the last updated rates, so it works when the Internet doesn’t.”

World Clock – “Always get “The right Time in the right Place”

Google Maps – “Google Maps makes navigating your world faster and easier. Find the best places in town and the information that you need to get there.”

Uber – “Uber is a ridesharing app for fast, reliable rides in minutes – day or night.”

Skyscanner – “Skyscanner all-in-one travel app. Flights, hotels and car hire, all in one place.”

Air BnB – “Unforgettable trips start with Airbnb. Find adventures in faraway places or your hometown, and access unique homes, experiences, and places around the world.”

*Disclaimer – This post contains affiliate links which means that if you click a link and go through to purchasing something from the link, I’ll earn some commission from that sale – which helps me to continue to write helpful posts like this one. Thank you for reading*

My Most Used Travel Gear EssentialsIf you’d like to keep up with my adventures and get social;

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10 Best Travel Experiences So Far

10 Best Travel Experiences So Far

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Here at Gunns Travels, I like to promote travelling in any form. Wether it is a long haul trip or short break away, I want to use this space to encourage anyone to get out and explore; to grow as an individual. On my journey so far I have had some amazing opportunities which I will share in this post. I wanted to pick out 10 (because the list could go on and on if I don’t put a number to it!) of the best travel experiences so far.

I want to show you what is out there and what is possible if you really want to do it. Like I have mentioned in previous posts, if you want something badly enough; make it a priority and focus. It’ll happen if you want it to.

I’ll start the list off with one of the experiences that has really shaped my travelling journey and me as an individual.

Volunteering in Nepal (1)

This was a no brainer to go on this list. My love for Nepal, the people, the food, the place and culture is in abundance. You can tell from looking through this blog, my social channels or if you hear me speak about it, that this holds a pretty special place in my heart. Choosing to volunteer was something that I always wanted to do, I had experienced it before but this was the first time I really invested in it – time wise. I lived and volunteered in Nepal for a little over 3 months; it is still one of my top memories to look back on.

I’ve written a more detailed account of my time in my mountainside village of Sipadol, that you can browse to really get a feel for the experience and people I met whilst there, read here.

I would encourage anyone to do some volunteering but research into i t properly. Don’t be a ‘voluntourist’, make sure you can invest time into the people you are helping when volunteering; even beyond the project itself. I have re-visited, supported and stayed in contact with the people I met because it is important that you invest in them and not just the short term experience.

Celebrating Holi Festival in India! (2)

There are a few celebrations that I had on my bucket list for some time. I always looked at the Holi Festival with such wonder and awe. It looked like such a great celebration to experience and get to understand. I remember booking my plane ticket to India and then realising I would be in the country for the festival.

The day came and it did not disappoint! The night before people made huge bonfires and smoke pillars filled the city of Jaipur where I was staying. The next morning I looked over the balcony of the hostel and saw people running through the streets covered in bright fluorescent powders and couldn’t believe it was actually happening! I met up with a friend and we rode a tuk-tuk out to a party that was happening and it was crazy. So much fun and everything I hoped it would be. It was really interesting learning about the meaning behind it all as well and getting to experience with locals.

I cannot recommend it enough if you are ever able to coincide your visit to India with the festivities, it really isn’t one to miss! The next date is Monday 13th March!

Seeing wild elephants in Kenya & Adopting one! (3)

My all time favourite film is: The Lion King. So it goes without saying that when I went to Kenya, I was a little bit excited. Now my favourite animal is an elephant. So getting to visit The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust was also pretty exciting for me. ‘You can just stand over there, they’ll be back from their morning walk soon’ *small grey blobs come strolling through the bushes in the distance with tall green escorts at their sides* The baby elephants arrived and started having a mud bath right next to us. It was so great to see elephants finally and we left having learnt a lot about what the trust supports and the conservation work they do. We left having adopted an elephant in support of the work DSWT provide.

We also got the chance to go on safari. There was a moment on a game drive where a wild adult elephant came right up to the jeep and I fulfilled my dream of seeing a wild elephant up close. Still makes me smile even when I write about it now.

Leading a team on development projects in Ghana (4)

A fantastic experience was volunteering 8 months of my time with VSO in Livelihoods projects in Ghana. I was a Team Leader for a team of 18-20 people over the course of 2 cycles and it challenged me in so many ways! I stayed with a host family for my duration and we worked in rural communities on livelihoods skills and in schools. It was an incredible opportunity and I cannot recommend anyone enough to apply to volunteer, you never know what could happen!

Volunteering responsibly is definitely something that I would actively encourage to anyone looking to do more productive travel with their time.

Camel desert safari (5)

One of my highlights from my trip to India has to be the incredible 3 day 3 nights desert safari through the Thar Desert in Jaisalmer. There’s something peaceful about being surrounded by nothing but sand for miles.

My favourite part of the whole experience was definitely camping – I say camping loosely as we pretty much put a mat on the sand and had a blanket – and falling asleep underneath the clearest night sky I have ever seen with a million bright stars above, I even saw some shooting stars! I’d really recommend looking up Jamin Desert Nomads if you’re planning on doing a desert safari when you visit Jaisalmer. Jamin is a really honest, helpful and friendly guy. Sujan is also a great camel rider/guide and the camels are looked after well.

Desert sunsets #ttot #travel #travelblog #desert #exploremore #wanderers #sunset🌅 #vsco #vscocam #vscotravel #igtravel

A post shared by Jack ✈️🌎👌 (@gunns_travels) on

Hiking to the top of a mountain for sunrise (6)

Whilst travelling around India I visited the scenic and serene town of Pushkar which sat atop a mountain. There was a huge holy lake that people travelled to see and lots of smaller mountains surrounding the town. I made a friend in the place I was staying and he asked if I wanted to hike at 5am to the top of one of them to see the sunrise. It was an early start and a long hike! But we finally made it to the top surrounded by monkeys and a few stray dogs that my friend knew – as he did this hike very regularly to see the sunrise! It didn’t disappoint, the town was still dark and so you could see a million little lights around the lake and jagged mountain tops as the sun started to rise behind them.

Sunrises and sunsets are awesome to witness anyway, but the location and the tranquility of it all made this a top travel memory for me.

#InstaVillageMission (7)

If you haven’t checked out this tag on instagram – then I’d seriously recommend it. I started it with a friend in Nepal whilst we were volunteering; it was such a great way to encourage & inspire creativity. There are a lot of great shots by Renee included in the tag and you should definitely go check her out and follow! It is one of my best travel memories and helped me think way more about the shots I was taking.

#instavillagemission instagram @gunns_travels
#instavillagemission by @gunns_travels & @renee_ezra – Instagram

Snorkelling The Great Barrier Reef (8)

Another bucket list item I always wanted to do and it lived up to my expectations! Deep blue water and crystal clear reefs. We snorkelled and swam with multi-coloured fish, turtles & sharks!

You can read more about The Great Barrier Reef and how I went about it here

Skydiving over a beach in Aus! (9)

Ignite that inner daredevil in you – do a skydive. It will honestly be one of the best experiences you can have. And skydiving over The Great Barrier Reef couldn’t be a better place to do it. I booked with Skydive Cairns who were great and really reassuring, the skydive cost £120 (with a beach landing) which is pricey but worth it. Again if you want a photo or video of it you’ll have to pay around £80 – which isn’t bad as its a one-off (unless you get the bug for it!) but depends on your budget and if you want to go on any other tours while you’re in Cairns.

Quick Prices: Adult with Beach Landing £120 $180 | Video & Photos £80 $120

Meeting everyone so far! (10)

Lastly, none of my experiences would have been what they are without the colourful, interesting bag of people I have met so far! There have been too many to mention but now I have friends and family all over the world thanks to travelling 👌#positivevibes

They have had a massive impact on how I think, what I do and how I want to continue to live. You can take something from everyone you meet and learn a lot just by having a conversation with someone.

My CPs ✌️last day laughs #ttot #travels #VSOICS #VSO #volunteer #africa #ghana

A post shared by Jack ✈️🌎👌 (@gunns_travels) on

This is the first portrait of a series I’m calling ‘Memories, Places & People’s Faces’. I want to create a photo collection of portraits & moments whilst I travel. First up is Prayash, who I met whilst staying at a guest house in Bhaktapur. He works there whilst attending some college classes and managing his radio show. If you’re ever in the area then tune into 107.9fm every thursday 3-4pm for some debates and slick tunes. Prayash dreams of becoming a media personality and enjoys exploring to see new views like the one behind him. He took me to see his home village and the incredible view from Nagarkot, thanks man! RJ Prayash #ttot #portrait #travels #travelgram #travelblogger #smile #people #nepal #instagood #instatravel #igers #wanderlust

A post shared by Jack ✈️🌎👌 (@gunns_travels) on

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10 Things I’ve Learned From Travelling

10 Things I’ve Learned From Travelling

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If like me, you love the idea of travel and you love to learn new things; then you’ll be able to take something from this post! Travel is one of the best ways you can learn, develop and share ideas or knowledge. It can be between new people or a self-reflective way of learning. In this post, I will talk about 10 things I’ve learned from travelling and how they have had an effect on my thinking now.

Hopefully you’ll get a little bit of inspiration and see that travelling is about way more than just racking up air miles and crossing off destinations on the map. I always like to do a reflective post once every now and again to arrange my headspace full of little travel post-its!

Learning a new language (1)

Going to a different country also means hearing and learning a new language. At first it is difficult to pick up the basics, especially as new tones and sounds shape different languages words. Some dialects are very hard to replicate if you’re not a native. But if you are surrounded by the language, fully immersed in it and spend enough time there; you can learn a new language much easier than if you were trying to from home. There have been many cases were I have been thrown into a new environment; where I have had to learn the local language.

When volunteering in Nepal I had to pick up a lot of Nepalese for a good few months. Whilst staying in Ghana for 8 months I also had to learn a lot of the local language, Twi. At first it is frustrating because you want to be able to communicate but can’t even say a basic sentence. But with a little time, practice and getting incredibly good at charades you can start to have conversations in a whole new language! I have loved the times where I have had to pick up a new language, it is always a great challenge and an even better way to connect with the locals.

Tasted new foods (2)

Another learning opportunity is sampling the local delicacies to the country your travelling in. Let’s face it, who doesn’t love food: even better excuse to indulge in all the dishes whilst you’re there! Learning to try new foods is part of the experience of seeing a new place. Food makes up so much of the identity of a country, so you can learn a lot just by tasting the dishes. I’ve had the pleasure of having a few home stays whilst travelling; which provided me with an authentic root straight to the heart of local cuisine!

Eating Dal Bhat home cooked and then sitting to eat with a local family is such a truly authentic experience. I’ve not only tasted the foods, but also eaten locally – by which I mean tried eating without a knife and fork! Some places I have lived in use hands or flatbreads as scoops to eat with – it has all added to learning about the whole of the countries culture. Another food related lesson has been learning to cook the local foods. I’ve loved being able to learn how to make momos (a kind of nepali dumpling filled with vegetables & meat) or my new favourite red-red, click here to learn how!

Community (3)

This word has taken on a whole new meaning and level of understanding that I didn’t have before I started to travel. The places or communities I have been have shown me that a community look out for one another, support and trust each other. At home you would never dream of saying hello to another random person walking down the street, but when you think about it, it is more strange if you ignore another human being. Travelling and living in some of the countries I have been to has taught me this. It has helped me to be more caring and to care about my own community.

Immersed In Culture (4)

Everywhere has its own identity and we call it culture. Travelling has enabled me to learn about more cultures that are completely different to my own. Since doing this it has helped me to learn new ways of doing things, wether it is cooking new dishes, interacting with different people or inspired new ideas for work. Travelling helps you to expand your thinking and learn a new way of doing things, because the world is such a diverse place. Don’t restrict yourself to your own surroundings.

Being more independent (5)

Travelling, especially travelling solo, has helped me to become so much more independent. I’ve learnt to book, organise and support myself whilst on the move in a different surrounding. At first it was daunting, the first time I was in an airport on my own I nearly freaked out, but you learn to be able to adapt and go with it. Independence is something not to be overlooked, because it is one of the sole drivers that enables me to keep doing it. If I didn’t feel confident or independent enough to be able to just go and travel; then I would never go very far or cope very well. Learning this independence whilst travelling has helped me in all aspects of life.

As someone who had always been more introverted, shy and anxious – travelling allowed me to learn to overcome and develop these attributes. Being more independent and as a result :confident; has probably been the biggest benefit of travelling for me than anything.

Organisation & Determination (6)

This leads on from my previous point, learning to be organised is something that has been enhanced whilst travelling. Making sure you are at places certain times for flights and having the skill to be able to plan whilst on the move has made me even more organised.

Determination: I’ve learnt that if you want something, prioritise it. Be determined with what you want to achieve. I am even more determined to travel than before I started travelling because I have realised I want to make this a lifestyle and not a one-off trip.

The world is a big, big place (7)

It may sound silly, but the World, Earth, life; is so much bigger than your home or country. But you only really get to understand this when you start travelling to further places and experiencing new things. The world is big, but once you start to explore, it seems a lot more possible to be able to keep exploring, than before.

‘Travelling is like a book, those who do not, only read the first chapter’

You’ll never truly be alone (8)

As cheesy as this may first sound, it’s 100% true. If you decide you can’t go travelling or explore other countries because you have no one to go with, think again. Travelling solo is daunting but there are so many people doing the exact same thing. You are bound to bump into people along the way and then it is only you deciding wether you want to connect with them, have a conversation or spend it on your own.

And Spending it on your own at times isn’t a bad thing either, it allows you to have room for self-reflection and development that is important in learning more about yourself or the country. But I can honestly say that spending a year travelling ‘solo‘ saw me have only a handful of days where I had some time to relax. So I welcomed those chances to be able to be on my own and listen.

A sense of adventure! (9)

Travelling, understandably has made my wanderlust & adventure seeking increase! I’ve learnt that there are so many more things I want to see, do, taste, experience and learn! I’ve learnt to be more curious and to try and learn at every opportunity. This has made me more assertive and inquisitive because when I’m in a country I want to leave feeling like I absorbed as much of the countries history and culture as possible.

I’ve also learnt to not always play it safe (I’m not saying be stupid) but to go off the beaten track, avoid the touristy hotspots and to ask questions you don’t know the answers to! You never know where something could lead or a connection you could make.

Always be sensible (well if you can afford to be a little loose with this then it is more fun) but there have been so many times where I have had such great experiences that I would never have had, if I didn’t have a sense of adventure. Travelling with a local friend I’d made to his local village for a wedding in India was amazing or travelling on top of a local nepali bus with livestock around narrow cliff edges – sounds dramatic – but so cool! Wouldn’t be memories I now have if I hadn’t learnt to ‘live a little‘ or ‘be in the moment‘.

Don’t always play it safe. But don’t be stupid!

Positivity & Appreciation (10)

A great way to end is to say that having been immersed in so many diverse and interesting countries’/ cultures; I have learnt the power of positivity and a whole new appreciation for my own life. From all of the aspects I have talked about you can learn to be more positive and appreciative.

When you are in a fortunate enough position to be able to experience and learn about all these amazing places how can you not be! I’ve also learnt to be more mindful and present in my own life. Not to rush, to stop and be thankful. I’ve learnt to meditate and develop more inner peace which before I started travelling I would never even of considered – now I realise how beneficial and important it is. There has been so much inspiration I have taken away from the places, people and countries I have visited which have all had a positive impact on my life.

#PositiveVibes always ✌️

Here are a few things I have discovered that have helped in creating a more positive mindset in this digital world:

Paths to Happiness: 50 Ways to Add Joy to Your Life Every Day

The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living

CalmCalm App

Positive News Twitter

Sunny Skyz

Action For Happiness

That’s it! I hope you’ve enjoyed the 10 things I’ve learned from travelling; feel a little more inspired to go out & learn some new things for yourself!

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10 things i've learned from travelling

30 Bucket List Things To Do Before 30

30 Bucket List Things To Do Before 30

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I thought I’d write up some incredible experiences to have in travelling – specifically around Asia as I’ll be heading there for the next few years. Have a read and enjoy some of these bucket items that will have your wanderlust on overdrive! I’ve previously made a ‘30 Bucket List Travel Goals‘ if you want to go and check that out! I thought I would make another now as I have completed some of the previous goals. I want to create a list that is realistic; now that I’m 25! 5 years to tick as many of these as I can, but also the rest of my life, 30 is just a good starting point 😉

This is also a good way to reflect on some of the amazing opportunities I have already experienced in the last few years. A lot have been unplanned (which is the best way). It just shows that if you put your mind to something and prioritise what you want from life; then making a list like this doesn’t seem so unobtainable as it first might seem…

A few notable ones have been: Holi festival in India, camel riding in the desert, meditating on a mountain, leading a team in Ghana, re-visiting my village in Nepal, running a half-marathon, rum on a pirate ship, seeing elephants in the wild again, visiting the Taj Mahal and so many more!

Here they are, 30 Bucket List things to do;

  1. Complete 1 year teaching abroad
  2. Walk along The Great Wall of China

    The Great Wall of China
    credit: wiki
  3. Celebrate Chinese New year in China

    Chinese New Year
    credit: lonely planet
  4. Island hopping in the Philippines

    Island hopping philippines
    credit: lonely planet
  5. See a wild tiger
  6. Ride on a boat down the Mekong River
  7. Have visited 30 different countries (10/30)
  8. See Panda Bears

    Panda bucket list
    credit: nat geo
  9. Learn a martial art
  10. Learn to cook a Chinese dish
  11. Take part in the Lantern Festival
  12. Live abroad for more than a 1 year
  13. Sunrise at Angkor Wat in Cambodia
  14. Ride in a hot air balloon hot air balloon bucket list
  15. See Orang-utans in Borneo
  16. Shop at the Bangkok floating markets
  17. Visit Myanmars Bagan temples
  18. Travel to Indonesia

    indonesia pinterest image for bucket list
    credit: pinterest link clickable
  19. Take a cruise around Ha Long Bay
  20. Travel south India

    credit: lonely planet
    credit: lonely planet
  21. Get another tattoo
  22. Continue to write and document!
  23. Head back to Nepal
  24. Head to a spa in Bali
  25. Swim in a waterfall
  26. Visit Marina Bay Sands and Gardens by the Bay in Singapore
  27. Go paddle boarding
  28. Huang pu River in Shanghai
  29. See the Terracotta army
  30. Travel to Sri Lanka

    sri lanka
    credit: Huffington Post

Hopefully I can achieve a lot of these ideas in the next 5 years or so, especially as I’m heading over to Shanghai to teach for year! When I write these lists it is never as ‘I must do these or I won’t be happy’. I write them for inspiration and to give some kind of direction. If I manage to tick even a handful of these things off before I get to 30 then I’ll be so grateful! What’s on your bucket list or things to do in 2017?

Share the ideas to inspire each other to keep experiencing new things and adventures!

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30 Bucket List ideas before 30

Exploring Silves | Portugal

Exploring Silves | Portugal

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Last year in between my trips to the eastern side of the globe, I managed to fit in a short break to Portugal! I visited the beautiful small town of Silves along the southern part of the country. It was a little rustic town with a medieval vibe, orange and lemon trees all over the city which all gave it a lot of character. Worn out mediterranean orange buildings with huge storks soaring around the skies of the town made this a great place to go and explore. The town is great for a short mini break and is definitely worth a visit if you’re visiting Portugal.

Silves Castle

Silves main attraction is the medieval castle in the centre of town which you can go and walk around; it is also the best preserved castle in the Algarve.

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Old Town

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Tall Ship Sailing – £25 per person (pickup & drop off from Silves – Includes ticket onto boat & smaller boat into caves)

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This was a great excursion to take as you get to sail along the coastline on a tall ship/pirate ship! There are so many hidden alcoves and caves that you get taken into in smaller boats to explore but just being on the ship was cool, with a rum in hand a pirate’s life was certainly for me.

Fresh Sea Food – Not to be missed!

The food here was great as you were able to eat fresh sea food that had been caught and brought up from the harbours the same day; as well as this we ate lots of tapas – also delicious.

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