Top 6 Must Have Apps In Shanghai

Top 6 Must Have Apps In Shanghai

with No Comments

I’ve been in Shanghai for 1 month now and there have been a few things that have made my settling in go incredibly smoothly – Apps! I’ll tell you the 6 must have apps in Shanghai to make your stay however long, way easier.

WeChat (1)

Without a doubt the number 1 app you MUST download before coming to Shanghai or China in general is WeChat. The app works much like whatsapp with a dose of Facebook & Instagram. The app combines most of the features found on those platforms into a social media giant. People here use WeChat to communicate, advertise, pay and live.

WeChat lets people scan each others QR codes to add friends, making it fast and easy to connect with everyone. Honestly, the second question you’ll get asked once you meet someone new will be “Do you have WeChat?”.

Once you connect a payment method to the account, you can pay for anything from food to clothes. An easy way to top up and purchase goods.

If you download one app from this list, get WeChat.

WeChat App

Ofo and/or MoBike (2)

The app is built for users to scan bikes around Shanghai. You can find yellow bikes (Ofo) or orange bikes (Mobikes) all over the city. You simply go over to the bike, scan the QR code and rent the bike for 1RMB. The difference between the two is that MoBike’s have a built in GPS, so you are able to locate the nearest bike to your location.

A cheap, fun and simple way to get around Shanghai.

MoBikeofo

Explore Metro – Shanghai (3)

The Shanghai metro system is a fast, reliable and easy way to move underneath the city. There are never any strikes and the lines run from 6:00am – 10/11:00pm (with some of the smaller lines closing earlier). Explore Metro allows you to plan a journey from A to B – by simply selecting your first point and then tapping your destination. The app will show you the fastest route to take, whether you need to change and approximately how long it will take you.

It’s saved me a few times from getting lost underground! Although there is incredibly easy to follow signs in English and Chinese as well as a colour coded system to make travelling around simple.

Explore Metro

Pleco (4)

Pleco is a translation app from English to Chinese and vice versa. Incredibly useful when you are trying to converse with someone who does not speak your language. You can look up hundreds of words to help any situation and aid you in connecting with locals, ordering food and finding your way around. It also works offline so you don’t need an internet connection once downloaded.

Pleco App

Air Quality Shanghai (5)

One of the downfalls of the city is the constant pollution caused by the expanding factories and use of fossil fuels. An app that helps you cope with this is Air Quality Shanghai. You are able to look up the current air quality of the city. You can determine whether it is safe to go out, wear a mask or in extreme cases to remain inside. Using a traffic light system and air quality percentage rating to present the information to you in an easy, digestible way.

Smart Shanghai (6)

A number 1 expat website hub now has it’s own app, which will help you with everything you could want. Housing, food, events, transport and more are crammed into this app created by expats for expats. If you need to search something or find advice then Smart Shanghai is a good one to have to hand.

Smart Shanghai App

There you have it, if you’re planning a trip to Shanghai give these apps a go to make your stay better!

Of course I also recommend getting a good VPN as well but that’s a whole other post!!

Make sure you stay up to date by following my social channels – I upload regularly to Instagram and right now there are some pretty cool shots from my first month in Shanghai. Check them out and connect, I love looking at other travel photos too!

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Travel. Create, Be Nice!

Pin this image if you think it would be helpful to you or someone you know!

Top 6 Must Have Apps in Shanghai Pinterest

My Most Used Travel Gear Essentials

My Most Used Travel Gear Essentials

with No Comments

We all have those go to essentials when we travel right? In this post I’ll list everything that I must have in my backpack when I travel. We live in a digital age so most of it comprises of electronics and digital enhancing travel goodies.

Most used travel gear essentials:

My Most Used Travel Gear Essentials

Anker Power Bank (1)

One of my most used travel essentials is definitely my ‘Anker Power Bank‘ It has saved me on so many occasions where I have had no access to power or have been in places that suffer from frequent power outages. It is robust, durable and can charge up to 3 devices at the same time via 3 USB slots. It charges my phone (iPhone 4S) up to 6 full charges and a full laptop (HP Notebook) charge. It has a torch function on the side as an added extra.

Cons – Slightly heavier than some of the others on the market. However it has never affected the portability in my case.

DSLR Camera (For photographers) (2)

These days with phone cameras and small portable cameras like Gopro’s, carrying a DSLR isn’t necessary; however I have always loved to use a DSLR when taking photos. There is still a higher quality you get when taking photos with a DSLR and as an amateur photographer this is something important to me.

I have been using Nikon products for about 10 years now and I can say that they always deliver on quality whilst providing you with options to take control of every aspect of the photos outcome. I have been using my ‘Nikon D7000 Digital SLR Camera with 18-105mm VR Lens Kit (16.2MP) 3 inch LCD‘ for about 5 years now and the quality is outstanding; with a 32-point auto focusing ring & high ISO (100-3200/H1&H2) performance in low light makes it a very versatile and effective camera.

Before the D7000, I was using a ‘Nikon D40 & 60‘ both great cameras for first time DLSR users – very good quality and easy to use controls.

I usually use a f1.8 50mm lens too, which captures most shots from portraits to landscapes. However I also switch between a f4.5 55-200mm and my go to kit lens f3.5 18-55mm.

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR f/1.8G Lens – 50 mm

Nikon 20050 AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200 mm VR II Lens for Camera

Nikon 18 – 55 mm f/3.5 – 5.6G VR AF-P DX Nikkor Lens for Camera

Here are a few examples of shots I have taken with each:

GoPro Hero 3 + (3)

A popular choice for most travellers and I am no different, my ‘GoPro Hero 3+‘ is great for being portable and resilient when I’m capturing moments on my travels. The housing that comes with it means I don’t have to worry about it being broken or getting knocked in action. It can shoot in 1080p and is easy to use via a 1 click button on the top and front of the camera. The housing means that the camera is waterproof so can also be used in water and allows you to capture great underwater photos/footage as well.

GoPro HERO3+ Silver Edition Camera/Camcorder

Cons – The red light on the front when recording flashes which can be distracting when trying to be discreet in public places – I get around this by putting some black tape over it which usually does the job. The sound quality is affected by the housing around the camera, so if you’re looking to capture sound I’d look into microphones or separate sound recorders to use with it.

Disposable Camera (4)

I love using disposables when travelling. They are lightweight, durable and take retro snaps for your travel journal – also very cheap and affordable! A great back up to carry with you if you can’t use your camera or phone!

Kodak Fun Flash Disposable Camera – 39 Exposures Pack of 2

Travel Journal/Notebook (5)

It may sound simple but having a journal or notebook is a great item to take with you if you’re a travel blogger or traveller in general. I’m aways getting ideas when I’m out and love to collect important information like times, dates, prices and receipts. It’s also a great idea to write up about your travels as you go because you meet so many interesting people along the way and go through a lot of different emotions that you’ll want to look back on in the future.
Travel Notebook: Gifts / Gift / Presents ( Ruled Traveler’s Notebook with Antique Map Cover ) (Travel & World Cultures)

Swiss Army Knife or Multitool (6)

A great item to carry with you! Always very handy and I nearly always use this when I am travelling – even if the ‘spork’ function is my most used!

Victorinox Huntsman Pocket Knife – Red

Mini Wireless Speakers (7)

A good item to carry with you if you’re volunteering or travelling with people is a ‘mini speaker’. It’s great to be social with and creates a fun atmosphere instantly. Try this ‘Speaker’ on the road – it’s served me well the times I have had to use one.

Portable Speakers, ZENBRE M4 Wireless Bluetooth Speakers with Enhanced Bass Resonator, Mini Speaker for iPhone, iPod, Computer, Laptop, Tablet (Black)

Sleeping Bag (8)

I always carry a sleeping with me – usually my lightweight ‘sleeping bag’ which covers me for most cases. If you’re going more extreme I’d advise getting a thicker tog as this is only a 2 season bag.

Lixada Envelope Outdoor Sleeping Bag Camping Travel Hiking Multifuntion Ultra-light

Travel Towel (9)

I use a ‘trespass’ mini travel towel which always comes in pretty handy!

Trespass UUACMIE30019_BBTEACH Wringin Microfibre Towel – Blue, 70 X 135 cm

First Aid Kit (10)

Of course you should never travel anywhere without one of these! I have never had to use mine for me ‘touch wood’ but it always seems to come into use for others when I’m travelling (especially plasters/bandaids when I’ve been volunteering with kids – plasters/bandaids are like gold dust once the kids find them!)

90 Piece Premium First Aid Kit Bag – Includes Eyewash, 2 x Cold (Ice) Packs and Emergency Blanket for Home, Office, Car, Caravan, Workplace, Travel

Universal Travel Plug (11)

Without a doubt, if you have all this fancy technology and gizmos when you travel you’ll need a universal adapter plug so you’re prepared for any country you visit. So much easier than carrying different plug adapters for different countries.

Travel Adaptor -Tevina Travel Charger Two USB Ports Universal World Wide All-in-one Wall Charger Adapter Plug Built-in 3.2 A For Home (Black)

 

My Most Used Travel Apps (12)

Dualingo – “Learn Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Irish, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, and English. Totally fun. Totally free.”

Currency Converter – “Convert every world currency with the XE Currency App – Free Edition. It offers live proprietary currency rates, charts, and even stores the last updated rates, so it works when the Internet doesn’t.”

World Clock – “Always get “The right Time in the right Place”

Google Maps – “Google Maps makes navigating your world faster and easier. Find the best places in town and the information that you need to get there.”

Uber – “Uber is a ridesharing app for fast, reliable rides in minutes – day or night.”

Skyscanner – “Skyscanner all-in-one travel app. Flights, hotels and car hire, all in one place.”

Air BnB – “Unforgettable trips start with Airbnb. Find adventures in faraway places or your hometown, and access unique homes, experiences, and places around the world.”

*Disclaimer – This post contains affiliate links which means that if you click a link and go through to purchasing something from the link, I’ll earn some commission from that sale – which helps me to continue to write helpful posts like this one. Thank you for reading*

My Most Used Travel Gear EssentialsIf you’d like to keep up with my adventures and get social;

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Travel. Create, Be Nice!

Festivals Around the World

Festivals Around the World

with No Comments

With Christmas 11 days away! I thought I’d talk about some of the different festivals around the world. Celebrating events is something that every culture anywhere can relate to wether its religious beliefs, a landmark in time or spiritual. There are so many I want to experience on my travels that I wanted to write a ‘festival bucket list’. Here are 10 of the Festivals I definitely want to experience in my lifetime!

 

  1. Holi Festival in India/Nepal

Holi is a spring festival, also known as the festival of colours or the festival of love. It is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities outside Asia.”

http://s1.dmcdn.net/BRwTo/1280x720-5IP.jpg - Festivals Around the World

2. Chinese New Year in China

“Chinese New Year is an important Chinese festival celebrated at the turn of the lunisolar Chinese calendar. It is also known as the Spring Festival, the literal translation of the modern Chinese name. Celebrations traditionally run from the eve to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first calendar month, making it one of the longest celebrated festivals. The first day of the New Year falls on some day between 21 January and 20 February.”

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/2414662/images/o-CHINESE-NEW-YEAR-LANTERNS-facebook.jpg - Festivals Around the World

3. Up Helly Aa Fire Festival in Scotland

“Up Helly Aa refers to any of a variety of fire festivals held in Shetland, in Scotland, annually in the middle of winter to mark the end of the yule season. The festival involves a procession of up to a thousand guizers in Lerwick and considerably lower numbers in the more rural festivals, formed into squads who march through the town or village in a variety of themed costumes.”

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02466/viking-boat-1_2466272k.jpg - Festivals Around the World

4. The Carnival of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil

“The Carnival in Rio de Janeiro is a world famous festival held before Lent every year and considered the biggest carnival in the world with two million people per day on the streets. The first festivals of Rio date back to 1723.”

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02841/rio-carnival--danc_2841261k.jpg - Festivals Around the World

5. Mardi Gras, New Orleans in USA

Mardi Gras is an annual Carnival celebration in the Southeast United States in New Orleans, LA.

The Carnival season, a variation of the traditional manner of preparing for the start of the Christian liturgical season of Lent, starts after Twelfth Night, on Epiphany (January 6). It is a season of parades, balls (some of them masquerade balls), and king cake parties. It has traditionally been part of the winter social season; which at one time was when parties for Southern Society women, débutante balls, were arranged.”

http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Slideshows/_production/ss-130212-mardi-gras/ss-130213-mardi-gras-01.jpg - Festivals Around the World

6. Pingxi Lantern Festival in Taiwan

“The Taiwan Lantern Festival is an annual event hosted by the Tourism Bureau of the Ministry of Transportation and Communications in Taiwan to celebrate the Lantern Festival.”

http://www.emlii.com/images/article/2014/02/52f056650e542.jpeg - Festivals Around the World

7. Songkran Water Festival in Thailand

“The Songkran festival meaning transformation or change. It coincides with the rising of Aries on the astrological chart, the New Year of many calendars of South and Southeast Asia. The festive occasion is in keeping with the Buddhist/Hindu solar calendar.”

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01871/Ayutthaya-elephant_1871481i.jpg - Festivals Around the World

8. Festival of the Sun in Peru

“The Inti Raymi (“Festival of the Sun”) is a religious ceremony of the Inca Empire in honor of the god Inti, one of the most venerated deities in Inca religion. It was the celebration of the Winter Solstice – the shortest day of the year in terms of the time between sunrise and sunset and the Inca New Year. In territories south of the equator the gregorian months of June and July are winter months.”

http://www.machupicchutravel.com/images/masts/inca-festival_masthead.jpg - Festivals Around the World

9. Diwali Festival of Lights in Nepal

“‘Deepavali (or Diwali, the “festival of lights”) is an ancient Hindu festival celebrated in autumn (northern hemisphere) or spring (southern hemisphere) every year. Diwali is one of the largest and brightest festivals in India. The festival spiritually signifies the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil, and hope over despair.”

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02397/girl-light_2397286k.jpg - Festivals Around the World

10. Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Mexico

Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and acknowledged around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey.”

http://i4.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article6734220.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/Estrella-Stephanie-Sigman-and-Bond-Daniel-Craig-in-the-crowds-of-El-Dia-de-los-Muertos-procession.jpg - Festivals Around the World

Looking at all those festivals around the world just makes me want to book tickets now and go experience those places!

 

Love TEFL 120 Hour English Teaching Course | REVIEW

Love TEFL 120 Hour English Teaching Course | REVIEW

with No Comments

TEFL, heres why…

Want to start travelling abroad? Don’t want to hang around for ages saving? Maybe consider getting yourself qualified to teach abroad with a TEFL qualification. I really want to start making travel a priority *even more so* in my life, so I started looking into ways I could earn money whilst travelling to give me a flow of income whilst on the move. I’m always looking to add another string to my bow and I really wanted to have a solid qualification to be able to approach potential employers with abroad. So, I started to research TEFL courses to study at home. Being able to show a certified TEFL qualification has already put me at the front of lots of employers and I have received multiple offers and had some Skype interviews already and I’m not even planning on going abroad until next year; so I can safely say this has already helped me a lot! Plus, I found the course and its content really useful. It’s a lot of common sense but also gives you the tools, theories and confidence to be able to approach an education establishment knowing all the technical jargon! It’s an investment into yourself, your education and your travelling dreams!

I’m hoping to use my TEFL qualification to go abroad and teach in Asia – hopefully in and around China! You can use it in many other countries such as Europe, South America and Africa as it is a globally recognised qualification.

Choosing a TEFL course with LoveTEFL

I researched a few different ones and came across LoveTEFL which at the time had a discount offer for one of their TEFL courses which included the 120 hour minimum TEFL qualification you can get along with some bonus qualifications on 1-to-1 teaching, teaching teenagers, group work, IELTS and helping with looking for work. It worked out the same price as the 120 hour course so I thought i’d make the most of the discount on offer! They offer the 120 hour TEFL, 180 TEFL & 300 hour TEFL. I went with the discounted 300 hour course to really maximise my knowledge and boost on my CV before I start teaching abroad. Keep an eye out as they usually do offers and bundles regularly so make sure you cash in on them and get as many hours as you can!

I’m currently half way through my course and am now on the teenagers & group work part of the 300 hours. I have completed my 120 hour TEFL which is the minimum I need for teaching abroad, so if I wanted to I could start looking for jobs now but I am looking to go early summer of 2016 so I’m making the most of the other parts of the course. I’ll receive my hard copy certificate once I’ve completed all modules but your able to send off for an e-certicifcate copy if you need to start emailing employers right away.

I’ve found the 120 TEFL really useful and it has enhanced my knowledge of teaching in a classroom a lot as well as equipping me with the necessary techniques and jargon to tackle the education environment. I’ve learnt how to create lesson plans catered to various levels, deal with foreign language techniques and lots of psychology in the classroom.

What they say:

“TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) is all about exploring our world while learning new skills and getting experience for ‘real life’. So whilst you’re checking out ancient temples in Thailand, spotting wildlife in Africa or riding a tuk-tuk to the beach with your friends, you’ll also be contributing to your career. Nice.”

“What is TEFL about? TEFL stands for Teaching English as a Foreign Language. It’s a professional qualification that equips you with the skills, knowledge and confidence to teach across the world. There is a huge demand for English teachers worldwide, and with a TEFL certificate under your belt you’ll be all set to pack your bags and travel the world!

tefl
Details and prices correct as of 06/12/15

 

Here at LoveTEFL, we believe TEFL is much more than just a teaching qualification; it’s an experience! Once you’re qualified we’ve got a range of teach and travel possibilities from paid jobs to supported internships, and even action packed adventure travel! When you arrive in-country, you’ll get a new perspective on the countries you’ll visit; immersing yourself in unique cultures, taking epic adventures and making lifelong friends along the way.

So what are you waiting for? Get TEFL qualified and take the first step on your very own adventure!”

All of their courses are completed 100% online which can fit in with whatever you are doing wether its working or studying. It’s a great benefit especially as I do work around it so the flexibility and freedom to manage it myself was something I found really great. They also offer;

  • 24/7 Access from any device, anywhere in the world
  • Professional TEFL training course
  • Internationally recognised TEFL certificate
  • Dedicated personal tutor
  • Free job service from our TEFL recruitment team

I’ve found LoveTEFL really great in delivering high quality content, useful techniques and thorough assessment of skills. Correspondence has been fairly good when I have needed it and grading has been detailed and constructive. The whole system is really easy to use and digest with mini quizzes throughout the modules. It’s easy to use uploading system for exam submissions makes it quick and stress free. If your looking for a TEFL course then I’d happily recommend looking into a LoveTEFL course.

If you’d like to keep up with my adventures and get social;

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Travel. Create, Be Nice!

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust | Adopting an Elephant!

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust | Adopting an Elephant!

with No Comments

I have always had a deep love for elephants. I think they are incredible creatures and have so many human like qualities that make them relatable. They are the gentle giants of the african plains and graceful grazers of the asian forests. Everything about them I have always enjoyed studying from the very first elephant toy to the countless documentaries I have seen. With all that said you can imagine my excitement when I found out that on my trip to Kenya we would be stopping at The David Sheldrick Widlife Trust.

If you don’t know what that means, here’s who they are:

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

Mission statement

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust embraces all measures that compliment the conservation, preservation and protection of wildlife. These include anti-poaching, safe guarding the natural environment, enhancing community awareness, addressing animal welfare issues, providing veterinary assistance to animals in need, rescuing and hand rearing elephant and rhino orphans, along with other species that can ultimately enjoy a quality of life in wild terms when grown.

One of the main ongoing projects at the trust is their orphan project which includes rescuing and hand-rearing orphaned elephants. I couldn’t wait to get there.

What they say about the elephant orphan project:

At the heart of the DSWT’s conservation activities is the Orphans’ Project, which has achieved world-wide acclaim through its hugely successful elephant and rhino rescue and rehabilitation program. The Orphans’ Project exists to offer hope for the future of Kenya’s threatened elephant and rhino populations as they struggle against the threat of poaching for their ivory and horn, and the loss of habitat due to human population pressures and conflict, deforestation and drought.

 

To date the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust has successfully hand-raised over 150 infant elephants and has accomplished its long-term conservation priority by effectively reintegrating orphans back into the wild herds of Tsavo, claiming many healthy wild-born calves from former-orphaned elephants raised in our care.

299953_10150276810689205_7182207_n

You pre-book a place beforehand and pay a small fee to go and see the elephants, usually when they get back from a walk and go to bathe. The keepers hand feed them using bottles of specially mixed milk. It’s a great sight to see and if you love elephants then you’ll be in your element. Its great to see the elephants playing around and messing about in the mud with each other and whats also great to see is the bond the keepers share with each individual animal. The keepers become their surrogate parents and are with them 24/7 feeding, walking, bathing, playing and sleeping.

SlipTiring being an Elephant

Bros

Elephants by Jack Gunns on 500px.comIMG_0097

One Man & His Elephant by Jack Gunns on 500px.com

 

Your given the opportunity to adopt an elephant and donate towards the upkeep of the trust. Of course I did this when I was there, it was about £30 ($50) you can obviously pay more than this if you wish. Adopting an elephant let me re-visit the trust at the end of my trip to help put young Kibo (my adopted elephant) to bed as well as help bottle feed him. It finished my trip in Kenya on a high and was great to get a real intimate personal time with the orphaned elephants who were all a lot more inquisitive once there wasn’t a crowd of people around and just as playful! You also get regular updates about your elephant even after they grow up and introduced back into the wild, I often get e-mails telling me how Kibo and the new orphans are getting on.

Adopting an elephant

I’d really recommend visiting this place and I’m sure you’ll agree seeing the amazing work they are doing to help orphaned animals all over Africa. Keep supporting this essential wildlife trust. You also see some rhino and giraffes whilst your there!

314749_10150276813609205_2146165_n

308278_10150276813504205_509323_n

If you’d like to see more of my travel photos from Kenya or my other photography then check my social links!

Flickr | 500px

If you’d like to keep up with my adventures and get social;

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Travel. Create, Be Nice!

Namaste Jack Uncle | Travel Talk

Namaste Jack Uncle | Travel Talk

with No Comments

“Namaste Jack Uncle” is what I would hear all the time on a daily basis. The kids here are among the happiest kids I’ve met and so content with so little. I was expecting it to be at least a week before they opened up to me and talked. Not at all, within the first few hours I had kids hanging from me like monkeys. I’ve gotten to know alot of them and kept finding myself anxiously waiting all day for the kids to come back from school so we could play and do chores!

the school run #nepal #ivhq2014 #chito

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

get to wake up to this everyday #nepal #travels #nature

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

so much red #shrine #nepal #temple #travelling

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

I sought out a tatooist while I was there. I now have arms full of snakes, cats, a house and some mountains. Little rahul is quite the artist. We took the kids to the temple and had a picnic one of the days which was more of a mission than it may sound at first. I went into town with our host sister Saroza to stock up on momos (kind of nepali dumplings if you will – a favourite amongst the children and myself!), we then took a taxi up the mountain which sounds impressive but then if you throw in the fact that Nepal has no real ‘roads’ so the path up the mountain was a little rocky – an even more impressive feat for the taxi driver. As well as this we took huge speaker amps up so we could have music to dance too and marched 21 kids up a to the top of a mountain. It was well worth it and I think I was way more excited than the children! Over the duration of my stay we had various volunteers from different countries come stay and the orphanage was as busy as ever. I went to the old city of Bhaktapur and got the chance to see the Gai Jatra festival. Everyone dresses up and its a pretty great atmosphere. It was a hive of dancing and stick clapping. The old city is quite amazing with lots of old temples and architecture. It’s pretty impressive. Overtime I went down to the old city I felt a sense of ancient history and awe at the buildings around me.

Bhakatapur festival #temple #nepal #rammedro #partytime

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

I also witnessed the birth of a baby calf on the farm. Just as we were leaving to go back one evening one of the mothers came shouting saying the gai (cow) was having a baby. We stayed and watched and it was incredible to see so close. We now have baby wally to add to the family. Just a typical day in the life of a volunteer.

Rohan and ‘wally’; the new addition to the fam #nepal #ivhq2014 #neckhug #baby #cow

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Time is flying! I have really settled into the nepali way of life and home now. The more comfortable im getting in my placement the more the days seem to be passing by quicker. I recently went to chitwan on safari where I met with the other volunteers from orientation, which was a great chance to catch up and see how everyones placements were going. The resort was really nice and we got to shower on top of an elephant! Then went on a canoe down the flooded river and an elephant safari. The weather held out for us and we only had one delay from a landslide on the way so pretty successful. More to come on my chitin safari adventure experience in another blog post!

Pdidi grass cutting #nepal #travels #farmlife #instavillagemission #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

We threw a birthday party for all the kids as it was two of their birthdays. Myself and the other volunteers bought mangos, rice pudding, a cake and new school bags for all 20 kids which was great! We danced alot and at one point got taken to a random party in the village as they were celebrating a festival as well. I had no idea what we were doing at a villagers house to begin with. Then music came on and everyone started dancing,  it was me and two other volunteers who were the only foreign people and the rest were nepali villagers. No one really spoke good english but everyone was so excited to have us there. They laughed at my questionable dance moves which I don’t blame them for because they were terrible! They offered us some delicious foods and then we went back to carry on partying with the kids and other volunteers. It was so fun and random to party with the locals and a truly unique moment. Life in the village was pretty sweet and loved being with the kids.

Jdidi Roti machine #nepal #ivhq2014 #food #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

The Nepali fam #nepal #homefromhome #ivhq2014 #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

The kids love mangos just a little bit #nepal #ivhq2014 #smile #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

pre-roti rolling with pdidi #nepal #food #culture #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

One man and his goats #IVHQ #nepal #goatherder #instagood

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

I also had the cool opportunity of experiencing the womens festival a day where women dress up, dance and fast for the whole day to pray for a good husband. In support of the females in the house I also fasted. It was a long day. The girls all looked grown up in thier best outfits and saris and we went to the temple to dance/me take photos. At one point jamona and bdidi pulled me in to dance. I felt like I was gonna be eaten alive by the women ‘praying for good husbands’ at the sight of a giant white man.

the girls getting ready for the womens #festival with #henna #nepal #ivhq2014

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

today was all about the ladies #womens #festival #nepal #culture #dancing #demsaris

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

We got the paints out one of days which was great to see kids getting creative. The younger boys ishan, rahul and ashok decided to put paint all over their hands and then ran through the home to the bathroom. They dropped dollops of paint everywhere and tried to wash in the bathroom, which just resulted in blue stains and streaks. It was funny to watch until ashok filled a bucket of water to throw at the paint and got half of it over me. We all laughed as we cleaned up the blue mess. The whole time ishan telling me not to tell anyone.

no tell saroza, no riya, no rupak #nepal #ivhq #oops #blue #instavillagemission

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

we unleashed arts & crafts today #nepal #ivhq2014 #instavillagemission #topstudent #moneyshot

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Nepal is pretty awesome. Made even sweeter by my little bro rahul who pinky promised me with both hands everyday. Then kissed them both and says “friends forever uncle, yes”.

before the painting got out of control #nepal #ivhq #painting #art

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

There were so many incredible moments during my stay with the Thapa family from aama (the grandmother/mother) cooking us delicious rice dishes every morning and evening but not being able to speak any english; which was interesting when she would keep piling more rice on our plates even if we were full up. I impressed everyone by learning the days of the week and numbers in nepali along with a few other nepali words and phrases which got me bonus points with the house mothers and aama. Going with Ashis one of the older boys every morning to sell the milk. Helping them all with their homework everyday and walking them to the bus stop for school; sometimes we’d get on the ‘smiley bus’ with them if were headed into town. Getting to know the house mothers, who on the most part don’t get as much attention as everyone else, so it was really great getting to know Jamuna, Maiya and Parabati; even if we had to act out most of our conversations due to language barriers – this made it all the more worthwhile!

Hajur baii #nepal #ivhq2014 #aseko #instavillagemission #laugh

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Bumpy bus ride – nepali style #bus #nepal #travelling #asia #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

The end of my trip was bitter sweet. I was super glad to get home and eat some home cooking but this was outweighed and overshadowed by the fact that I was leaving my new family behind. Half of me was now entwined with this small nepali village. I never expected to fall in love with an entire village and the kids. The kids I had been with everyday for 2 whole months, who I walked to the bus stop and stayed up with to help with their homework. The kids I had bonded with, I had to say goodbye too. I’d never felt such a heavy pull on my heart as I did the day I had to leave and get in the taxi to the airport. I was leaving behind new friends, a home and a new family.

As soon as I landed back in England I was happy but sad that it had come to an end. I lasted four months being back before I booked another flight back there. I’m heading back to my nepali family and I couldn’t be happier!

this view though #nepal #travelling #instavillagemission #incredible #colourspopping #mountains

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

big and small #nepal #ivhq #bestbuds #instavillagemission #hands

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

If you’d like to keep up with my adventures and get social;

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Travel. Create, Be Nice!

 

Chitwan Safari at the Eden Jungle Resort | Travel Talk

Chitwan Safari at the Eden Jungle Resort | Travel Talk

with No Comments

Whilst in Nepal I made sure I got to visit one of the regions famous national parks in Chitwan. Located in the southern part of Nepal, Chitwan is about 6-7 hours travel from central Kathmandu via tourist bus. I would recommend travelling in a tourist bus as you get your own seat, water and toilet breaks; the driving is also ‘slightly’ safer as there are less people in them compared to one of the local buses.

I went on a 2 night 3 day safari tour at the Eden Jungle Resort which cost around £59 ($90) which I thought was super cheap for what you get!

Eden Jungle Resort
Eden Jungle Resort

The bus journey from Kathmandu was incredibly long and we got stopped a few times due to small landslides (which are very common throughout Nepal before you worry) along the way. Bring some food, a book and some water; maybe pack some travel sickness tablets just in case. You do stop off a few times for toilet breaks and at local cafes so there are opportunities to get food along the way, however always keep in mind in Nepal that the food may not be what you are used and ‘nepali belly’ much like ‘delhi belly’ is quite common amongst travellers. Be smart about food choices, I pretty much stuck to rice and momos!

Once I arrived at Chitwan we were picked up and taken to our home for the next few days. We were greeted with smiling friendly faces – as you get anywhere in Nepal – and briefed on the iteniary. We were taken to our rooms and were able to have a quick freshen up before heading out on a tour of the resort. The rooms are fairly basic but sufficient for what you need, its not luxury but does the job. You are provided with beds, a ceiling fan, nets and a bathroom; consisting of a western toilet, sink and shower.

We immediately went for a tour around where they kept the elephants and shown around the grounds. We were lucky enough to see one of the famous one horned rhinos bathing in a stream in the first 20 minutes of being there! They showed us the river which at the time was overflowing due to it being the monsoon season. We were able to watch the sunset and then head back for a cold everest beer!

Elephant HairdoOne-Horned Rhino

Later that evening after a buffet style dinner we were driven to the nearby Tharu village where we were treated to some traditional tribal stick dancing. This was a great atmosphere and interesting to see the tribes cultural heritage. Afterwards we headed back to our resort to get some well earned rest after the days travelling but not before we squeezed in a few more everest beers!

The next day we had an early breakfast (breakfast and dinner are included at the resort) and went down to the river where we got into canoes down the river. There are opportunities to spot gharial crocodile, various birds and monkeys. We got out further down the river and went for a short walk through some local villages. Unfortunately when I was there we were not able to go over to the elephant breeding center to see the baby elephants as the river was so high we could not cross safely, however you are usually able to see them up close.

During the afternoon we had some free time so went into the local village to have a look for some souvenirs and to grab a quick lunch. Lunch turned into nearly 2 hours waiting, always remember your on nepali time haha

chitwan 1
You’ll get used to seeing elephants just walking around the village!

We headed back to the resort to quickly freshen up by taking a shower…with an elephant. A pretty cool experience but definitely came out smelling a lot more worse than I wen into it! I made a quick purchase of one of the resort t-shirts and went for another shower minus the elephant.

the best way to shower in nepal! #elephant #powershower #nepal #travels

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Hatti are awesome #elephant #nepal #travelling #closeup #vscocam A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Next we jumped into a jeep and travelled over to the forest where we were then able to go on an elephant safari. It was a really cool way to see the reserve and some of the animals including deer, rhino and monkeys; left me feeling a bit achey in my legs though! During the Chitwan Safari you have a well experienced guide who spots all the animals a mile off through trees and bushes. When you get off at the end theres usually children selling bananas for a few rupees to feed the elephants with make sure you buy a few to reward them for all the walking they just did.

Elephant EyesElephant Safari

Deer Ears

can’t get enough of these guys #elephant #nepal #travelling #safari A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

legit jungle book #chitwan #jungle #safari #nepal #travelling #vscocam

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

For the evening we went our for dinner to make the most of some of the western food that is available here before heading back to our homestay placements. Grabbed yet another couple of everest beers – my favourite if you couldn’t tell by now – before heading to bed to get some rest and digest the days elephant antics.

Early morning wake up call for some bird watching and breakfast and then back onto the tourist buses to head back to Kathmandu.

Chitwan is a great few days away activity whilst travelling around exploring Nepal. I’d head there between october-march to really get the most out of the experience the temperature isn’t too bad at around 25°C, the best months for viewing game is late january-march as the grass is cut shorter improving disability. Check out Lonely Planets essential guide for your trip.

If you’d like to see more of my travel photos from Nepal or my other photography then check my social links!

Flickr | 500px | Instagram

Arriving in Nepal | Travel Talk

Arriving in Nepal | Travel Talk

with 1 Comment

flying into kathmandu valley #mountains #nepal #travels

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

The kathmandu valley, Birds eye views are the best #nepal #landscape #instadaily A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

I finally arrived in the Tribuhuvan airport in Kathmandu Nepal, after a gruelling 32 hours travel from Sydney. The flight into Nepal was great getting to see glimpses of the incredible mountain range and gliding through the clouds to the airport.

Stepping outside the airport was a flurry of shouting, smells and blinding light. It’s very overwhelming at first especially if your travelling solo, I had no idea where to go or what I was doing. But once I found my airport pickup – who was holding a makeshift sign with my name questionably spelled on it – we made our way to Kathmandu guest peace house. They definitely call it a ‘culture shock’ for a reason; it couldn’t be more different to England but I was looking forward to embracing it and learning alot from this experience. Nepals road system is questionable but I held on and took in the busy sights all around. Im not going to lie you have to be prepared for it, I was so overwhelmed and slightly terrified as I got into a small white van with two foreigners who spoke little english. I spent most of the journey planning my escape route! Luckily I had gone through an organisation IVHQ so I had some comfort but it was still pretty scary.

After settling into my new guest house and having my first taste of breakfast – which was very sweet ‘bread’ and black coffee. Needless to say Nepal doesn’t have access to many of the foods I’d usually be having but even this was a luxury as I knew my host family wouldn’t be serving this once I was on placement. So for now I made the most of it and looked forward to my few days of orientation.

had the blackest coffee for breakfast. #coffee #buzz #breakfast

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

My 3 day orientation was so much fun and a great way to start the experience. We had one of the smallest groups in a while at 15 people including 2 canadians, 2 french, 2 italians, 2 aussies, 1 Netherlands, 2 chinese, 2 portugese, 1 hawaiin and me representing the brits. Everyone was so cool and we bonded really well as a group so much that most of us have booked to do the chitwan safari in 2 weeks time which will be great to catch up! The orientation consisted of visiting the beautiful monkey temple Swayumbhunath. The temple is, as the name suggests, populated by monkeys who have no fear about going right up to you and are incredibly curious; also fairly intimidating when you start to get surrounded by them. We made our way up steps towards the main stupa taken in the awesome views of the Kathmandu valley surrounded by vast mountain ranges. Thousands and thousands of colourful prayer flags covered the entirety of the temple grounds. We got to take a look into an art gallery to find out about how some of the masters paint works such as the mandela and buddhas eyes. It was really interesting to find out about the different levels of mastery in the artwork and how the masters use gold within parts of their paintings. As we carried on our journey we made it to the top of the stupa; when visiting a stupa, you must walk around it clockwise. You can also spin the prayer wheels that line the base of it to create good karma or energy as you go round.

Just incredible views! #nepal #mountains #travels A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

so many cool statues on the climb up #buddha #peace #temple #travelling

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Anything You Like?

Swayambhunath #monkey #temple #peace #travels A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Monkey TempleMonkey See

Prayer WheelsThe orientation provided another trip to the Buddhist haven of the Boudhanath Stupa where we got to witness yet another marvel of building and detailed craft of Nepal. This particular stupa had 108 small images of the Dhyani Buddha Amitabha around it.

Boudhanath #temple #nepal #travels A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Stupa GuardsDragonpot

We also got to see the famous Durbar Square and do a bit of shopping in Thamel. If you’ve been to Kathmandu you’ll know its a dusty combination of old meets new with buildings on top of buildings stacked up and crammed in. But it is a hive of life and interest, as there is always something happening and you can walk into a shop and find pockets of peacefulness to sip your coffee that you wouldn’t have expected find compared to the high speed noises high streets just outside. It a bizarre yet wonderful mix of bustle and calm. There are tonnes of shops, souvenirs and cafes to explore that you’ll have a hard time not picking up  at least something! A lot of the shops in Thamel sell western snacks – like oreos – which after placement will be a welcome relief, make sure you stock up on a few packs to take with you! You can also find ATMs scattered around most with armed guards around them. I’d take out as much as you need but be sensible, don’t carry too much on you – most of the placements around Nepal will also have places you can draw some out. Also be clever about it as some of the machines charge a fee to draw out. Once I got to my placement I pretty much drew out most of my money as I knew after meeting my  host family that I could keep it safe in their home and it was easier as I was based there for the duration as well as it being a quiet village. I only took out small amounts whilst I was in Kathmandu.

Buddha | Peace

notes with elephants and rhinos on! Now thats my kind of money #nepali #currency #traveller #elephant A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

One last thing about Thamel – if you want a great place to have a drink or two in the evening or day – head to Phat Kath and grab yourself an Everest beer! We loved it and its a great starting point to onto some of the other bars along the hight street. Don’t get lost in the maze of guest houses and shops that start to meld into one giant jingo game after a few days of living there!

had drinks at the coolest little treehouse style bar #drinks #phatkath #nepal #travelling

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Our orientation had to come to an end after a great few days learning about the culture, meeting new friends and exploring the many temples of Kathmandu. It was sad to leave them all to go to placements but exciting to see were you will be based for the next few months!

I then got placed in Bhaktapur not too far from kathmandu but much more rural which was a welcome change. The volunteers, host Family and staff there were all friendly and welcoming. The kids were awesome. Too cute. I started getting called ‘Jack Uncle’ by them all. The next few months were going to be on some of the best I had ever experienced!

So I’m about a week into ‘living’ in Nepal now. I love it. The initial shock and anxiety has been replaced with excitement and awe at this beautiful country. Filled with breathtaking scenery, a wealth of culture and so many friendly faces!

Stay tuned for my next instalment to my adventures in Nepal!

If you’d like to see more of my travel photos from Nepal or my other photography then check my social links!

Flickr | 500px | Instagram

My Experience with IVHQ | Nepal

My Experience with IVHQ | Nepal

with No Comments

I chose, after a lot of research and endless googling, to volunteer in Nepal through the company IVHQ to do childcare work within an orphanage placement. I’ll talk about my experience with the company as well as give a run down of what I went through pre-trip and whilst on placement. All views and experiences are my own.

 

What they say…

“International Volunteer HQ (IVHQ) provides affordable, safe and responsible volunteer abroad programs in 30 different countries around the world. Each year, IVHQ places thousands of volunteers on our volunteer abroad programs and offers a wide range of volunteer travel opportunities in Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Madagascar, Victoria Falls, Uganda, Zambia, South Africa, Bali, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Philippines, Mexico, India – Delhi, India – Dharamsala, Vietnam – Hanoi, Vietnam – Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam – Ha Long Bay, Cambodia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Thailand, China, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia – Bogota, Colombia – Cartagena, Morocco, Peru – Cusco, Peru – Lima, Laos, Romania, Italy and Fiji.

Established in 2007, IVHQ has grown to become the world’s leading volunteer travel company, offering a variety of projects for volunteer travelers, including Teaching, Childcare, Community Development, Medical, Construction and Renovation, Turtle Conservation and Wildlife Conservation.

Whether you are traveling abroad, taking a gap year, wanting to experience a volunteer vacation, or simply wishing to provide assistance in a developing country through volunteer travel, International Volunteer HQ has the program for you.

With volunteer program fees starting from USD$180, you will not find a more affordable, high quality and trustworthy international volunteer travel company.”

 

What I say…

“IVHQ was definitely one of the more affordable companies for volunteer work I came across, especially what you got for the money and the variety of destinations you have to choose from. You really can get a lot out of the experience without the massive price tag of what other companies are offering, because after all your a choosing to volunteer so don’t want to have to pay an arm and leg to do so! There are other ways to volunteer cheaper – by going directly to in-country organisations, organising parts of the trip yourself i.e. accommodation, familiarising yourself without guides however for a first time experience in a country like Nepal I was more than happy to pay the small amount extra to get all of this included in the fee price.

IVHQ right from the start provided email correspondence to answer any queries I had, organised airport pickup, accommodation, placements and have an extremely friendly team to welcome you and check up n you throughout your placement. They also provide a weeks orienteering at the start to introduce gently into the culture and lifestyle of Nepal before sending you to your host-family placements; as well as some language lessons which come in handy!

I wouldn’t have had a clue where to start with arranging all of this so this is why IVHQ is a great company to volunteer through if your new or solo travelling. I can safely say that the team in Nepal made me feel safe, welcome and at ease before I started my placement. With this in mind I would recommend going for more than 2 weeks to really make the most of your time volunteering in Nepal. Once you take the week off for the orientation (which is essential at the start I think) you should try to have at least 2 weeks+ in your actual placement. I saw people come and go within a week or two which leaves no time to really ‘make a difference‘ or get to know the people your working with. It frustrated me that a few were just using it as a cheap way to travel – this isn’t fair on the children you are working with. If your choosing to volunteer then invest your time with the kids.

“I wouldn’t have had a clue where to start with arranging all of this so this is why IVHQ is a great company to volunteer through if your new or solo travelling”

The support from the team lasted throughout my 2 month placement with regular visits to make sure I was alright and to help with any trips I wanted to plan whilst there – they even arranged tickets and weekend trips to Chitwan National Park which I wouldn’t have known were to go for. The IVHQ team also checked in with me online via email and answered other queries I had.

I was lucky enough to be placed with a fantastic host family and the most incredible children at Bhaktapur Self-Sustaining Orphanage. I decided to stay in the same place for the duration of my stay to really get to know them. All I can say is I knew when I chose to volunteer I was going to help, what I didn’t expect was to fall in love with an entire village. Everyone from the host family, children, house mothers, villagers and locals  are like my home from home now. I’m entwined with an entire nepali village on the side of a mountain and am heading back to visit everyone in March ( keep up to date by following @travelling_jackg or my social links).

“I knew when I chose to volunteer I was going to help, what I didn’t expect was to fall in love with an entire village”

So, all in all IVHQ was a great company to volunteer through. They gave me the confidence and ease to volunteer without all the headache. I had support, help if I needed it, introduction to culture and a base of friends right from the off. Like I said you can do it cheaper but compared to the other companies out there this is one of the cheapest for what you get! You get a quality service without the ridiculous price tag and is ideal for people starting off. From doing this experience I can now say I’d be happy to just go to Nepal and organise it myself without an organisation but thats only because I had such a positive introduction thanks to IVHQ.”

Here’s a quick breakdown of what I paid volunteering through IVHQ and other additional costs:

IVHQ Program Fee – £620

Flight – £400 return (LHR – KTH) – I booked through STA travel however in hindsight use sky scanner for a better variety of deals.

Visa – £70 – Apply via the Nepal embassy – send your passport off and get it back with recored delivery. You can also get a visa on entry to Nepal I just wanted everything done before I got there.

Travel insurance – £30 via post office

Criminal background check – £50 via .gov

Vaccinations – varies depending own what you need, I had already had quite a few for a trip to Kenya previously so only needed a typhoid one which was free. I also took malaria tablets which you only need for a small part of Nepal in places like Chitwan however I never ended up taking them as it was only a two day stay. I just wanted to be prepared incase I was placed here for the whole of my stay.

Check what you need here.

Average weekly expense – £0 – £10 (Nepal isn’t very expensive at all, especially as food is including in the accommodation – although don’t expect anything fancy. Expect rice, a lot of rice)

Chitwan 2 day safari – £80 (I’ll write a more detailed post on this as well as trekking expenses)

More blog posts to come about my experiences and time in Nepal, make sure you keep up to date by following my social links!

You can expect:

  • Nepali culinary delights
  • How to bond with an entire nepali village
  • My experience with a bad stomach ache and a mountain
  • 3 new didis, no english and lots of acting out

Stay tuned!

Fraser Island, Australia | Travel Talk Pt.4

Fraser Island, Australia | Travel Talk Pt.4

with No Comments

The beautiful island of Fraser is situated on the East Coast of Australia and is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful places I have seen. Stunning clear water lake, tropical canopies and sandy white beaches make this a must see place on your travels along the east coast.

I went on a 3-day excursion through Sunset Safaris which was definitely not long enough but unfortunately I was squeezed for time. The tour was well organised and very informative by our tour guide ‘Scuba Steve’ who provided an entertaining tour for the duration. We also got to ride in a huge 4×4 safari truck which was quite comfortable and pretty cool racing over the sand dunes in! I could have spent a few weeks here easily. Nevertheless it was fantastic and Im really glad I got to experience this place even if just for a short amount of time.

From rainforest walks, to crystal clear streams and a spot of whale watching it couldn’t have been any better. Accommodation and food were included throughout. We visited The pinnacles, Rainbow beach, fresh water lake, mahino shipwreck and explored the entire island; spotting a fair few wild dingos as well. For now I’ll leave you with a few snaps from my time here and hopefully I’ll be able to go back for a longer stay one day!

Quick Price | Adult 3 Day Excursion £240 $370

amazing couple of days on fraser island doing a truck safari #fraser #island #australia #truck

A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Australia you delivered #beach #paradise #instadaily A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Aussie Coasts

Jungle book. #rainforest #disney #austrailia A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Maheno Shipwreck

found my new thinking spot #fraserisland #australia #instadaily A photo posted by Jack Gunns (@jackgunns) on

Coloured Sands

Coloured Fraser Sands by Jack Gunns on 500px.com

If you’d like to keep up with my adventures and get social;

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube

Travel. Create, Be Nice!

1 2